Thursday, October 19, 2017

tjThe original American Founder leadership was the product of a particular educational system, known to the great leaders of the past, but lost to modern academia. It is a principle-centered process grounded in the belief in God and immutable moral law, framed on the classics of literature, history, science, the arts, and philosophy and crowned in the discipline of real-world application under the guidance of a committed and caring mentor. Come meet together with other committed parents, who wish their children and grandchildren to have this type of education, for a day of instruction, inspiration, and rejuvenation.

What is TJEd?

Thomas Jefferson Education declares that education means that a student has acquired the ability to think independently and creatively and has the competence to successfully apply his or her knowledge and skills in real-life situations. Dr. DeMille says, “There are seven principles of successful education—when they are applied, learning occurs. When they are ignored or rejected, the quantity and quality of education decreases.” (Although each of the seven keys has been given a catchy phrase to make it easy to remember, don’t get caught up in the semantics of the phrase, but come to understand the concept.)

You, not Them.

If you want your child to get a superb education, you as a parent must show your child how to learn. You must be an example. Focus on your education, and you will find that your talents will expand as you study and learn; and you will be able to better assist your children in their learning. An added benefit is that you will also end up with an excellent education.

Inspire, not Require.

Great teachers inspire their students, and students who are inspired will voluntarily work very hard at whatever venture they have undertaken. Those teachers who make requirements a part of their curricula will not get the same enthusiastic response. However, parents can become very creative in inspiring their children, particularly by allowing choice. Additionally, be aware that this principle does not translate to “ignore, not require.”

Structure Time, not Content.

Choose a time that fits the rhythm of your family that will be consistently set aside for study. The learning phases of the children will determine what is happening during this structured time. Consistency in “doing school” is perhaps more important than any particular subject or activity being offered.

Simplicity, not Complexity.

Dr. DeMille points out that “great teachers train great thinkers and great leaders by keeping it simple.” Study the great people and characters in history in a multitude of subjects, write about them, discuss them in various settings, and apply what is learned.

Classics, not Textbooks.

A classic is a work that can be studied over and over. A student must study great works to become great; the study of a mediocre curriculum will create mediocre students. Another description of a classic is that it instills a desire to become better.

Mentors, not Professors.

A professor teaches what he thinks is important, usually to a group, and he decides what level of conformity will be required to pass the course. A mentor, who works one-on-one with those being mentored, will determine the particular objectives and needs of the student (mentee) and devise a personalized program to realize them. Usually, the parents are the first mentors for young scholars, but it is important that those mentoring the classics have had the experience of being mentored themselves.

Quality, not Conformity.

A student who is inspired should always be expected to perform at his or her personal best. Parents or mentors should provide immediate feedback and support, but only quality work should be accepted. Students work for mastery of the subject rather than to simply complete assignments to pass the class.

Although there is no specific order to these keys, the principles may be easier to discern and implement within the context of the phases of learning. As can be seen, Thomas Jefferson Education is not a specific homeschooling methodology, but a set of true principles of learning that can be applied to any educational model that is not a conveyor-belt form.

Schedule 2012

  • SCHEDULE 2012
      Registration                      8:30 a.m. Welcome                          ...
    Read More...

The Classic Track

The Classic Track
A classic is a work that can be revisited over and over again with new epiphanies gained from each experience. The lectures of the Face to Face with Greatness seminar series are definitely classics. Because...
Read More...

Session I - 11AM- noon

Jet Fuel for Home Schooling Session I  11 – noon -- followed by a 15’ break -- Hour 1 of the classic track: the basics of TJEd The secret to Thomas Jefferson Education is a little known principle...
Read More...

Session II- 12:15 - 1:15 PM

The Four Vital Phases of Stellar Learning Human brain development is not a tidy process depicted by a gradually ascending line on a graph. It can be messy and sporadic, better illustrated by a series...
Read More...

Session III -2:30-3:30 PM

Your Questions Answered A panel of experienced TJEd veterans will respond to your questions about implementing leadership education in your home.
Read More...

Session IV - 3:45-4:45

The Seven Keys of Remarkable Teaching Hour two covers the different phases that your student will go through during the formative years. Now let’s talk about how you can become a Master Teacher. There...
Read More...

Session V - 5-6 PM

A Revolutionary Life How to Transform a Your Life into Something Extraordinary! In high school, I had a secret desire to do something revolutionary. Usually, I envisioned staging a walk-out after the...
Read More...